Author: Alan Gorkin

Bigonia Capriolata

Bigonia Capriolata

Bignonia capreolata Athens – Photo courtesy of Brushwood Nursery, Clematis Specialists Bignonia capreolata, also known as cross vine, is currently blooming in our shaded back service area now. I had not seen this vine blooming in my nearly ten years at Sleepy Cat Farm! Cross […]

Musings of Spring

Musings of Spring

This has been one of the most unusual Springs I can remember. Taken as a whole, the weather has been rather cool and wet, which has set back planting tender annuals by a couple of weeks. Luckily we have been able to utilize the greenhouse to […]

Spring Bulbs

Spring Bulbs

Narcissus ‘Hawera’ This past Fall we forced  bulbs in plastic pots by burying them  in a leaf covered trench — (see blog post “Fall Happenings at Sleepy Cat Farm”). Here are some of the results: Narcissus ‘Hawera’, a wonderfully fragrant and bright, greenish yellow miniature […]

Freshly Harvested Ramps

Freshly Harvested Ramps

Ramps, or wild leeks (Allium tricoccum), were once relegated to growing in the wild, but this springtime vegetable is being grown in more and more vegetable gardens. They have a flavor that blends Spring onions and garlic. Ramps are delicious eaten on their own, pickled, […]

The First Azalea’s Blooming at Sleepy Cat Farm

The First Azalea’s Blooming at Sleepy Cat Farm

The first Azalea to bloom at Sleepy Cat Farm is the Rhododendron dauricum f. “album” – a pure white Azalea (Rhododendron ssp), that grows 5-8 feet tall and thrives in our shaded woodland. For most of the Winter, it appears as a leggy plant with […]

Welcome Peter Mauerman to the Sleepy Cat Farm Team

Welcome Peter Mauerman to the Sleepy Cat Farm Team

Peter ” Pete ” Mauerman is the new Assistant Horticulturist at Sleepy Cat Farm.  Peter has over eight years of experience in the field at several firms, as well as full scale farm operations. While in the industry, he has developed skills in plant breeding, aquaculture, aeroponics […]

A True Sign of Spring

A True Sign of Spring

While cutting back the old spent foliage of Hellebores, I came across an Aesculus fruit (Horse Chestnut) which had germinated. Most hardy woody plants have a safety mechanism which requires seeds to be moist and chilled for several months. After satisfying this dormancy requirement, they […]

The Future of Food

The Future of Food

The Greenwich Community Gardens presents “The Future of Food” –  an evening dedicated to food and agriculture. Learn how regenerative farming can feed the planet, reverse climate change, restore the environment… and be a successful business! A screening of the film “Unbroken Ground” by Patagonia, will […]

Fickle March Weather…

Fickle March Weather…

…from one day to the next!

Color from Late Winter Flowers and Bark

Color from Late Winter Flowers and Bark

Pictured: Cornis Sericea: “Arctic Fire” adds interest in Winter with its colorful bark. Plants create interest in the garden in many ways: foliage, flowers, fruit, bark, form, and so on.  Adding new plants to a mature garden sometimes means removing plants that have begun to decline. […]